Korea’s Five Best Festivals, Period

Korea’s Five Best Festivals, Period

If I am quite honest, most Korean festivals are two steps short of being great or even good for that matter. They are either too crowded (Seoul’s International Fireworks Festival), completely lost objectivity (Boseong Green Tea Festival), or a foreign drunk-fest (Boryeong Mud Festival). If you’re looking for something worthy of traveling half way across the world, the following festivals will not disappoint.

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Five Amazing Untouristy World Heritage Sites

Five Amazing Untouristy World Heritage Sites

[The following is a guest post from a fellow UNESCO fanatic named Jordan Adkins (his bio and blog link is at the bottom). I found his entries very fascinating (especially #3) so I hope you enjoy them as well. If you would also like to contribute your top 5 UNESCO sites and are a fellow travel blogger, shoot me an email: maximuz04 (at) gmail.com]

Have you ever visited a tourist site and thought it looked better in pictures? Or arrived only to be overwhelmed by hordes in tourist buses? I feel your pain! Global tourism is booming, and yet everyone seems to go to those same few places…Eiffel Tower, Colosseum, Statue of Liberty. Now this is not without good reason but we have a huge planet out there to explore. There must be somewhere we can have a little time and reflection to ourselves? Well yes there is … there are over 1000 UNESCO World Heritage Sites, most of which have very few visitors, and are spread out all over the globe. I myself have been to 200+ so far and want to help people explore the lesser-known gems. So I put together a list, from my experiences so far, of 5 Amazingly Un-touristy World Heritage Sites! Hope you enjoy, and are inspired to visit more yourself!

#1 of 5 Amazingly Untouristy World Heritage Sites:

The Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum in Malta

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The Hal Saflieni Hypogeum (underground cemetery) was only found in 1902 during residential construction in Malta. Little did the workers know they had stumbled upon an enormous subterranean structure which was originally excavated in 2500 B.C.. Little is known of the incredible neolithic find other that its construction at the time was unparalleled with any other known developments on earth. Huge blocks of coralline limestone where lifted into place to create this ancient space, which was originally a sanctuary, but then became a necropolis in prehistoric times. Today it is one of the treasures of Malta and strictly guarded. Only 10 people are allowed in per hour on a limited guided tour (to prevent excess carbon dioxide and air humidity damaging the rock paintings), with no back-packs, cameras or other items. These guys are serious, and tickets sell out months in advance but WOW…It is worth it! Not to be missed!

P.S If you in the area check out my guide to the Top Five Things to Do in Malta!

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Top 40 Things to do OUTSIDE of Seoul, Korea (2017 Edition)

Top 40 Things to do OUTSIDE of Seoul, Korea (2017 Edition)

40 Outside Seoul

So you’ve visited Seoul and love it with all of its palaces, shopping districts, and nightlife, but now… you’re looking for something new. You grow weary of this Seoul-centric Korea and want to see what else is out there. Well, I’m here to tell you that the rest of the country does not disappoint. Here is your countdown to the 40 best things to do OUTSIDE of Seoul (2017 Edition).

Note – A couple of places overlap with  the list of Top 80 Things to do in Seoul. This was done on purpose for two reasons. First, many of these lie in the greater Seoul metro network, making a separation impractical for a guide. Secondly, it is a good benchmark for you to compare how these places stack up to places in Seoul!

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Seokguram Grotto and Bulguksa Temple

Seokguram Grotto and Bulguksa Temple

Location: Gyeongju, South Korea

Bell in BulguksaVisited: Sept, 2010 / March, 2011 / Oct, 2013

Site Type: Cultural

Inscribed: 1995

Background and Opinion:

This, Korea’s oldest UNESCO site, is actually a dual submission of ‘two temples’ which are adjacent to each other, the large Bulguksa Temple, and the smaller cave temple of Seokguram. Bulguksa was first built in the 8th century during the Silla period and serves as one of the few remaining examples of their architecture.

Seokgatap Pagoda
Dabotap Pagoda

One particularly impressive part of the temple is the set of two stone pagodas known as Seokgatap and Dabotap. While nothing has ever been found (officially) inside of Dabotap, the former had a number of relics dating back from the construction of these structures in 750 CE. One of these relics was a piece of the oldest known remaining woodblock print of the Mugujeonggwang Great Dharani Sutra. The two pagodas, the relics and five other structures account for a total of 8 national treasures in Bulguksa alone, 7 of which still remain on site today. Read more