The Great Korean Road Trip – Day 19 – Jeju Hallasan National Park

This is my third trip to Jeju. My first trip was in 2011 and I visited again in 2013. In all three trips, Jeju Island has had 2 main highlights: The wonderful beaches, and Hallasan National Park.

Mount Halla is the tallest peak in South Korea and is the centerpiece of Jeju Island. It can be seen from anywhere in the island and climbing to the top was one of the coolest things I did in Korea (back in 2011). However, my knees weren’t what they used to be and to be honest, getting to the top of stuff isn’t really on my to do list anymore. Today, Sid and I just wanted the most beautiful scenery on a rather moderate slope. Read more

Gunung Mulu National Park – Evaluation

Deer Cave Mulu National ParkLocation: Mulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Visited: July 28-31

Site Type: Natural

Inscribed: 2000

Background and Opinion:

Gunung Mulu is one of two National Parks in Malaysia that are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, with the other being the far more traveled Kinabalu National Park. It contains dozens of caves comprising one of the top ten longest cave systems in the world (215 km long) and possibly the largest by volume. On top of its impressive caves is a forest (530 square kms) with enough flora (3,500 species) and fauna (21,000 species) to keep nature lovers (especially insect lovers) pleased for days on end.

Bat Exodus Gunung Mulu NP

The 2.5 million strong “bat exodus” every night is as fantastic as it sounds and even if you’re expecting it, nothing quite prepares you for an hour long stream of bats of over a dozen species gushing out of Deer Cave to consume 30,000 kilos of bugs a night.

Clearwater Cave Mulu
A river flows through Clearwater Cave.

Enough with the numbers though, here is my not so technical evaluation: It is freakin’ mind-blowing. The best time to go is yesterday, but the second best time is now!

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Yellowstone National Park

Old FaithfulLocation: Wyoming, USA

Visited: July, 2009

Site Type: Natural

Inscribed: 1978

Background and Opinion:

In 1871, the famous American geologist Ferdinand Vandeveer Hayden made a successful survey of the Yellowstone area and pleaded his case to congress. For his time, the proposal was pretty ludicrous, but he managed to convince our lawmakers. He argued that there was more to gain by leaving the land aside than to auction it off to developers. In March 1st, 1872, Yellowstone National Park became the first National Park in the world. Read more